The SALT
Program

Senior Learning Programs

Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

SALT, or Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity, offers a wide variety of educational classes, local trips, book discussions, breakfast speakers, and travel (U.S. & overseas) for those in the community 55 and over. The mission of the SALT program is to stimulate learning and discussion that will enrich lives, foster relationships, and strengthen the varied communities in which we live.   Read our for full details.

Membership Perks Include

  • Invitation to take SALT classes (when you take 3 classes, the 4th is free!)
  • Free “listener pass” classes in Trinity’s traditional program in both the fall and spring semesters
  • Limited access to Trinity’s Fitness Center
  • Free on-campus parking sticker (no need to replace if one has already been issued to you)
  • Invitation to special theater performances and lectures
  • Invitation to music department recitals and concerts
  • Free admission to regular-season home athletic contests
  • Free WiFi while on campus
  • Student ticket rate for the Southwest Symphony Orchestra (SSO) performances on campus. Purchase student tickets and bring your SALT ID card with you to the performance.

Costs

The annual individual membership fee is $35; membership is required before registering for any classes. (But registering for membership and classes may be done at the same time.)

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱One-session classes are $15 per course, two-session classes are $30 per course, and three-session classes are $40 per course.

Available Courses

Tuesday, May 5, 9am–3pm
Depart from the Ozinga Chapel at 9am.
Jim Kwasteniet, history of Chicago educator

Join us as we walk the streets of downtown Chicago observing the  amazing architecture of the city and learning about the history of those magnificent buildings. See some of the very first “skyscrapers” of the late 19th century and many buildings that are on the National Registry of Historic Buildings. This is a walking tour covering approximately 2-3 miles. We will take frequent breaks. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and bring money for lunch. Transportation and our tour costs are covered in the $25 fee. Registration is required by April 15.

Class Session: Wednesday, May 6, 9–10:15am
Classroom Building, Room 215

Tour: Wednesday, May 13, 9am–2pm
Depart from Ozinga Chapel at 9am
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Roger Wiers, history educator

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱What do you know about Pullman—the man, the company, the strike, and the community? Maybe you have had brunch at the Florence Hotel, traveled on a Pullman car, or known someone who worked for the Company. Pullman porters played an important role in the Great Migration to the north. What does it mean that Pullman is a National Monument and how has that designation impacted the community? This class will examine the history of The Pullman Palace Car Company and its company town, as well as, the changes that have occurred since the closing of the manufacturing facility and its 2015 designation as a National Monument.

There will be two sessions. The first will meet on campus and the second will be a tour of the Pullman community. This tour will include sites such as The Greenstone Church, the Dunbar House (an executive mansion), Method Soap, and the 111th Street Food Hall. We will take a short walking tour and meet with representatives of The Chicagoland Neighborhood Initiatives, an organization that has helped with the development of the community. Transportation and our tour costs are covered in the $40 fee. Registration is required by April 15.

Friday, April 3
Dessert Reception: 6:30-7pm
Art and Communication Center, 2nd floor lobby

Performance: 7:30pm
Art and Communication Center, Marg Kallemeyn Theatre

Dr. John Sebestyen, professor of communication arts and director of theatre

Madeleine L’Engle’s classic novel is brought to the stage in Trinity Christian College Theatre Program’s spring performance, A Wrinkle in Time. A Wrinkle in Time is the story of Meg Murry, a high-school-age girl, who is transported on an adventure through space and time with her younger brother, Charles Wallace, and her friend, Calvin O’Keefe, to rescue her father, save humanity, and find herself.

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱Please join us for a pre-show dessert reception with Dr. John Sebestyen, director of A Wrinkle in Time. Before we experience the opening night performance, Dr. Sebestyen will join us to present “An Insider’s Guide to the Play,” sharing stories about Trinity’s staging of this classic piece of American literature.

Dr. Sebestyen will offer unique insight into themes of the play and share practical approaches to staging this fantasy. You are also invited to join us immediately following the performance for a post-show discussion, featuring the cast, the crew, and select Trinity professors speaking about how they view the themes of the play through the lenses of their academic disciplines. A ticket to the play is included in the $20 registration fee. Registration is required by March 15.

Thursday, April 16, 10–11am
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Terri Maxeiner, Vice President of Providence Solutions

Terri Maxeiner has been serving in the geriatric nursing field for over 35 years, specializing in care coordination and education for the older adult. Come hear how to “Live Your Best Life Now!” Terri will discuss topics such as family and friend relationships, health and hobbies, finances and directives, downsizing and living accommodations, volunteering, and preparing for what’s next. Registration is required by April 1.

Monday, May 4, 1–2:15pm
Heritage Science Center, Room 200
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Dr. David Brodnax, professor of history

History Professor Dr. David Brodnax will lead a discussion on Ta-Nehisi Coates’ recent book, The Water Dancer. A Los Angeles Times’ book review describes The Water Dancer as “a spellbinding look at the impact of slavery that uses meticulously researched history and hard-won magic to further illuminate this country’s original sin” in which “Coates envisions the transcendent potential in acknowledging and retelling stories of trauma from the past as a means out of darkness.” The book and discussion are relevant for the historical issues of race and slavery but also for the contemporary practice and lasting effects of racism and racial discrimination today. Registration is required by April 15.

Thursday, May 7, 10:30am–12pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. Larry McClellan, professor emeritus of sociology and community studies

In the decades before the Civil War, more than 3,000 fugitive slaves/freedom seekers traveled through the Chicago region on their way to freedom in Canada. Dr. McClellan introduces these journeys and the networks of support that evolved to become the Underground Railroad. He will be emphasizing journeys and sites in communities south and southwest of Chicago. Registration is required by April 15.

Monday, May 11, 10–11:15am
Heritage Science Center, Room 200
Jeff Hoelzel, attorney at law

Understanding how financial matters impact your day-to-day situation can make a big difference in your life. The goal of Financial Literacy 101 is to enhance your understanding of financial concepts and services so that you can make good and informed decisions with your financial resources. We will cover a variety of topics including budgeting, saving, debt management and planning for retirement. Basic principles of investing will also be explored. The tools explored throughout this presentation will enable you to take control of your own financial education and prevent financial problems before they start. Registration is required by May 1.

Mondays, March 30 & April 6, 9–10:15am
De Vos Athletics and Recreation Center, Room 106
Dr. Shari Jurgens, professor of physical education

Senior Exercise Science students will lead participants in discussions about physical and nutritional wellness and how healthy eating and physical activity contribute to our overall wellness. Being healthy involves being able to move throughout our lifetime, which includes long term health, but also short-term enjoyment of life. We will discuss the importance of stretching, strengthening, movement and even give some nutrition tips. Each session will include about half of the time in the classroom and half in the fitness center, learning new exercises and stretches. Before participation in the fitness center, a waiver will need to be signed by all participants—all exercises and stretches will be tailored to your fitness  level. Registration is required by March 15.

Wednesdays, April 8, 15, 22, 1:30–2:45pm
Heritage Science Center, Room 211
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Dr. Dennis Connelly, professor of criminal justice

Ever wonder what cop shows cops watch? Here is the opportunity to learn about the television heroes of yesterday like Lee Marvin in M Squad and Sergeant ‘Just the facts, ma’am’ Friday’ from Dragnet, to later shows, such as, Hill Street Blues. This class will discuss the television shows that accurately attempt to depict policing, such as, Police Story, to those that are not as accurate. We will view and discus scenes from the  selected shows while discovering how the shows were developed, discussing technical advisors, and learning interesting facts about television and the police force. Registration is required by April 1.

Wednesdays, May 4, 11, 18, 2:30–3:45pm
Classroom Building, Room 205
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Cleo Lampos, storyteller

So many stories and pieces of history escape our attention. By focusing on the lives of women who quilt, Cleo Lampos combines glimpses into the past with the personal narrative of those who created fabric masterpieces, sometimes in difficult circumstances. Time will be allowed for participants to display their own quilt and tell the story of its significance.

Session 1: Trail Quilts. The westward expansion of the United States pushed one covered wagon train after another across the Great Plains to Oregon. On board these ships to the new land were stacks of quilts. As the pioneers progressed on the trail, other comforters were stitched. The philosophy of these sturdy women as they trekked across the unknown is reflected in their quilts.

Session 2: Sunbonnet Sue. In the 1930’s, the United States faced the harshest economic era ever. Dust clouds decimated the farms of the Great Plains. Resources grew scarce. In the midst of the Great Depression, one quilting pattern grew to iconic status: Sunbonnet Sue. Discover the psychological under pinnings of this feed sack success. Learn the history of the decade of despair as Lampos displays her
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Sunbonnet Sue Quilt

Session 3: Hmong and Amish Quilts. During the Vietnam War, the Hmong Mountain People of Laos and Cambodia helped the American troops. These people were forced to flee their homes as the Communists took over their land. Some Hmong settled near the Amish communities of Ohio. That is where the story of God’s grace begins. Lampos will display examples of Hmong and Amish quilting as she tells an inspiring story of living in community. Registration is required by April 15.

Tuesdays, May 5, 12, 19, 3:30–4:45pm
May 5 Ozinga Chapel, Room 133 (Van Namen Recital Hall)
May 12, 19 Ozinga Chapel, Room 130 (Kortenhoven Choral Room)
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Jeff Timmer, director of vocation and career development

This course will look at music’s role in both current and past evangelistic efforts around the world. We will “visit” multiple areas including Japan, East Africa, Central Brazil, and Oceania to hear and discuss the worship music traditions of other believers. We will also discuss some of the challenging cultural change issues connected to music and missions, along with recent efforts to assist new believers in developing their own indigenous hymns. Jeff Timmer completed a master’s degree in ethnomusicology
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 and engaged in thesis research in Japan. Registration is required by April 15.

Wednesdays, May 6, 13, 20, 2:30–3:45pm
Classroom Building, Room 203
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱In this class we will examine the history of immigration—first during its classic century from 1820 to 1920; second during a time of restriction and reopening of immigration from 1920 to 1965; and third  during the last fifty years of changing patterns, competing viewpoints, and current issues. Although we will consider broad trends and focus on particular policies and statutes, we will also read short passages from immigrant memoirs which relate immigrants’ uncertainties and hopes in coming to America. Registration is required by April 15.

Thursdays, May 7, 14, 21, 3:30–4:45pm
Heritage Science Center, Room 104
Dr. Lou Sytsma, professor emeritus of chemistry

Out of the 90 elements that occur in nature, seven were mentioned as early as Bible times. Today, over 80,000 different chemicals are in commercial production. This class will explore both some of those chemicals that had a hand in influencing history as well as the characters that developed those chemicals. Registration is required by April 15.

Thursdays, May 14, 21, 28, 1:30–2:45pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Rev. Greg Janke, pastor

Using N.T. Wright’s book Paul: A Biography as our guide we will explore the formative influences on the Apostle Paul, follow the progress of his ministry, and examine the development of his teaching. Come and  discover something new about this familiar New Testament writer. Registration is required by May 1.

+ One Day Tours/Excursions

Tuesday, May 5, 9am–3pm
Depart from the Ozinga Chapel at 9am.
Jim Kwasteniet, history of Chicago educator

Join us as we walk the streets of downtown Chicago observing the  amazing architecture of the city and learning about the history of those magnificent buildings. See some of the very first “skyscrapers” of the late 19th century and many buildings that are on the National Registry of Historic Buildings. This is a walking tour covering approximately 2-3 miles. We will take frequent breaks. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and bring money for lunch. Transportation and our tour costs are covered in the $25 fee. Registration is required by April 15.

Class Session: Wednesday, May 6, 9–10:15am
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Classroom Building, Room 215

Tour: Wednesday, May 13, 9am–2pm
Depart from Ozinga Chapel at 9am
Roger Wiers, history educator

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱What do you know about Pullman—the man, the company, the strike, and the community? Maybe you have had brunch at the Florence Hotel, traveled on a Pullman car, or known someone who worked for the Company. Pullman porters played an important role in the Great Migration to the north. What does it mean that Pullman is a National Monument and how has that designation impacted the community? This class will examine the history of The Pullman Palace Car Company and its company town, as well as, the changes that have occurred since the closing of the manufacturing facility and its 2015 designation as a National Monument.

There will be two sessions. The first will meet on campus and the second will be a tour of the Pullman community. This tour will include sites such as The Greenstone Church, the Dunbar House (an executive mansion), Method Soap, and the 111th Street Food Hall. We will take a short walking tour and meet with representatives of The Chicagoland Neighborhood Initiatives, an organization that has helped with the development of the community. Transportation and our tour costs are covered in the $40 fee. Registration is required by April 15.

+ One Session Offerings

Friday, April 3
Dessert Reception: 6:30-7pm
Art and Communication Center, 2nd floor lobby

Performance: 7:30pm
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Art and Communication Center, Marg Kallemeyn Theatre

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱Dr. John Sebestyen, professor of communication arts and director of theatre

Madeleine L’Engle’s classic novel is brought to the stage in Trinity Christian College Theatre Program’s spring performance, A Wrinkle in Time. A Wrinkle in Time is the story of Meg Murry, a high-school-age girl, who is transported on an adventure through space and time with her younger brother, Charles Wallace, and her friend, Calvin O’Keefe, to rescue her father, save humanity, and find herself.

Please join us for a pre-show dessert reception with Dr. John Sebestyen, director of A Wrinkle in Time. Before we experience the opening night performance, Dr. Sebestyen will join us to present “An Insider’s Guide to the Play,” sharing stories about Trinity’s staging of this classic piece of American literature.

Dr. Sebestyen will offer unique insight into themes of the play and share practical approaches to staging this fantasy. You are also invited to join us immediately following the performance for a post-show discussion, featuring the cast, the crew, and select Trinity professors speaking about how they view the themes of the play through the lenses of their academic disciplines. A ticket to the play is included in the $20 registration fee. Registration is required by March 15.

Thursday, April 16, 10–11am
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Terri Maxeiner, Vice President of Providence Solutions

Terri Maxeiner has been serving in the geriatric nursing field for over 35 years, specializing in care coordination and education for the older adult. Come hear how to “Live Your Best Life Now!” Terri will discuss topics such as family and friend relationships, health and hobbies, finances and directives, downsizing and living accommodations, volunteering, and preparing for what’s next. Registration is required by April 1.

Monday, May 4, 1–2:15pm
Heritage Science Center, Room 200
Dr. David Brodnax, professor of history

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱History Professor Dr. David Brodnax will lead a discussion on Ta-Nehisi Coates’ recent book, The Water Dancer. A Los Angeles Times’ book review describes The Water Dancer as “a spellbinding look at the impact of slavery that uses meticulously researched history and hard-won magic to further illuminate this country’s original sin” in which “Coates envisions the transcendent potential in acknowledging and retelling stories of trauma from the past as a means out of darkness.” The book and discussion are relevant for the historical issues of race and slavery but also for the contemporary practice and lasting effects of racism and racial discrimination today. Registration is required by April 15.

Thursday, May 7, 10:30am–12pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Dr. Larry McClellan, professor emeritus of sociology and community studies

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱In the decades before the Civil War, more than 3,000 fugitive slaves/freedom seekers traveled through the Chicago region on their way to freedom in Canada. Dr. McClellan introduces these journeys and the networks of support that evolved to become the Underground Railroad. He will be emphasizing journeys and sites in communities south and southwest of Chicago. Registration is required by April 15.

Monday, May 11, 10–11:15am
Heritage Science Center, Room 200
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Jeff Hoelzel, attorney at law

Understanding how financial matters impact your day-to-day situation can make a big difference in your life. The goal of Financial Literacy 101 is to enhance your understanding of financial concepts and services so that you can make good and informed decisions with your financial resources. We will cover a variety of topics including budgeting, saving, debt management and planning for retirement. Basic principles of investing will also be explored. The tools explored throughout this presentation will enable you to take control of your own financial education and prevent financial problems before they start. Registration is required by May 1.

+ Two Session Offerings

Mondays, March 30 & April 6, 9–10:15am
De Vos Athletics and Recreation Center, Room 106
免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 Dr. Shari Jurgens, professor of physical education

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱Senior Exercise Science students will lead participants in discussions about physical and nutritional wellness and how healthy eating and physical activity contribute to our overall wellness. Being healthy involves being able to move throughout our lifetime, which includes long term health, but also short-term enjoyment of life. We will discuss the importance of stretching, strengthening, movement and even give some nutrition tips. Each session will include about half of the time in the classroom and half in the fitness center, learning new exercises and stretches. Before participation in the fitness center, a waiver will need to be signed by all participants—all exercises and stretches will be tailored to your fitness  level. Registration is required by March 15.

+ Three Session Offerings

Wednesdays, April 8, 15, 22, 1:30–2:45pm
Heritage Science Center, Room 211
Dr. Dennis Connelly, professor of criminal justice

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱Ever wonder what cop shows cops watch? Here is the opportunity to learn about the television heroes of yesterday like Lee Marvin in M Squad and Sergeant ‘Just the facts, ma’am’ Friday’ from Dragnet, to later shows, such as, Hill Street Blues. This class will discuss the television shows that accurately attempt to depict policing, such as, Police Story, to those that are not as accurate. We will view and discus scenes from the  selected shows while discovering how the shows were developed, discussing technical advisors, and learning interesting facts about television and the police force. Registration is required by April 1.

Wednesdays, May 4, 11, 18, 2:30–3:45pm
Classroom Building, Room 205
Cleo Lampos, storyteller

So many stories and pieces of history escape our attention. By focusing on the lives of women who quilt, Cleo Lampos combines glimpses into the past with the personal narrative of those who created fabric masterpieces, sometimes in difficult circumstances. Time will be allowed for participants to display their own quilt and tell the story of its significance.

Session 1: Trail Quilts.免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱 The westward expansion of the United States pushed one covered wagon train after another across the Great Plains to Oregon. On board these ships to the new land were stacks of quilts. As the pioneers progressed on the trail, other comforters were stitched. The philosophy of these sturdy women as they trekked across the unknown is reflected in their quilts.

Session 2: Sunbonnet Sue. In the 1930’s, the United States faced the harshest economic era ever. Dust clouds decimated the farms of the Great Plains. Resources grew scarce. In the midst of the Great Depression, one quilting pattern grew to iconic status: Sunbonnet Sue. Discover the psychological under pinnings of this feed sack success. Learn the history of the decade of despair as Lampos displays her
Sunbonnet Sue Quilt

Session 3: Hmong and Amish Quilts. During the Vietnam War, the Hmong Mountain People of Laos and Cambodia helped the American troops. These people were forced to flee their homes as the Communists took over their land. Some Hmong settled near the Amish communities of Ohio. That is where the story of God’s grace begins. Lampos will display examples of Hmong and Amish quilting as she tells an inspiring story of living in community. Registration is required by April 15.

Tuesdays, May 5, 12, 19, 3:30–4:45pm
May 5 Ozinga Chapel, Room 133 (Van Namen Recital Hall)
May 12, 19 Ozinga Chapel, Room 130 (Kortenhoven Choral Room)
Jeff Timmer, director of vocation and career development

This course will look at music’s role in both current and past evangelistic efforts around the world. We will “visit” multiple areas including Japan, East Africa, Central Brazil, and Oceania to hear and discuss the worship music traditions of other believers. We will also discuss some of the challenging cultural change issues connected to music and missions, along with recent efforts to assist new believers in developing their own indigenous hymns. Jeff Timmer completed a master’s degree in ethnomusicology
and engaged in thesis research in Japan. Registration is required by April 15.

Wednesdays, May 6, 13, 20, 2:30–3:45pm
Classroom Building, Room 203
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱In this class we will examine the history of immigration—first during its classic century from 1820 to 1920; second during a time of restriction and reopening of immigration from 1920 to 1965; and third  during the last fifty years of changing patterns, competing viewpoints, and current issues. Although we will consider broad trends and focus on particular policies and statutes, we will also read short passages from immigrant memoirs which relate immigrants’ uncertainties and hopes in coming to America. Registration is required by April 15.

Thursdays, May 7, 14, 21, 3:30–4:45pm
Heritage Science Center, Room 104
Dr. Lou Sytsma, professor emeritus of chemistry

Out of the 90 elements that occur in nature, seven were mentioned as early as Bible times. Today, over 80,000 different chemicals are in commercial production. This class will explore both some of those chemicals that had a hand in influencing history as well as the characters that developed those chemicals. Registration is required by April 15.

Thursdays, May 14, 21, 28, 1:30–2:45pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Rev. Greg Janke, pastor

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱Using N.T. Wright’s book Paul: A Biography as our guide we will explore the formative influences on the Apostle Paul, follow the progress of his ministry, and examine the development of his teaching. Come and  discover something new about this familiar New Testament writer. Registration is required by May 1.

Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

免费人做人爱的视频,一级做人爱Andrea Dieleman

Director of Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity